Stay and the sun caused the English wine explosion

One of the silver linings of this pandemic is that many are shopping more locally – whether it’s for their own walks or just for more seasonal fruit and vegetables – and it’s an encouraging discovery that also benefits our fast-growing domestic wine-making industry. .

Wine sales in Britain have been booming this year, especially at a time when bars and restaurants are closed and patriotism is high, according to a report in The Times.

Waitrose told the newspaper that UK wine sales were up 33% year on year, while total wine sales were up 11.7% year over year. A spokesperson told The Times: “Our customers love the novelty of producing high quality wines on site.” Majestic Wines also posted a 127% increase in wine sales in the UK.

Another factor contributing to the popularity of British wines is of course the vineyards, which are mostly spread across East Sussex, Suffolk and Hampshire and are frequently open for tours, lunches, dinners and, of course, shopping. With nearly half of the 500 UK guests open this summer, many are seeing an increase in sales from guests who would normally be able to vacation in Europe but were rejected by changes in quarantine restrictions.

The last few years have been phenomenal for British wines. A three-month heat wave in 2018 produced the coveted crop, while planting has increased 25% in the two years since then, and now 3,500 hectares of land is being propagated.

“British sparkling wine is a must in the best restaurants and bars, and best of all, Sussex will be in a category of its own,” co-founder Rathfinny Sarah Driver told Tatler earlier this year.

However, this summer’s yields have decreased compared to the high yields of 2018 and 2019, which is understandable because of the pandemic. However, the sunshine in August and September produces aromatic fruits and promises that 2020 will be a rare harvest after bottling.

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