The top five tips for storing wine at home

The wine deserves the best. Regardless of whether you have six or 60 bottles, make sure they are in the best condition before serving. Storing wine properly can be a serious business, but most people will not have the luxury of a wine cellar or a place to make it. You might also feel that the wine cooler is also a little wasteful for a few bottles that you buy every week. Wine cellars and coolers can create wine storage. However, if it’s not for you, these five simple steps can help you find out where and how to store your wine at home.

  1. Store at the appropriate temperature

Of all the factors that can affect wine during storage, temperature fluctuations are perhaps the biggest threat. Very hot or cold is a sure way to damage your wine. In general, the ideal temperature for long-term wine storage is around 13 ° C. However, if you store it in the medium to short term, you should store it in the range of 7 ° C to 18 ° C. Stability is the key, and if the temperature in the storage area You can rise above 20 ° C, you might have a problem. So you might be able to turn it off somewhere in your kitchen and somewhere near the radiator at home. A dark cupboard, often under the stairs, if you have one, is a good choice. To find the best place, you can place a thermometer in the area for several days to test the condition. Check at different times of the day for temperature differences.

  1. Don’t keep your wine in the fridge for too long

The ideal temperature in the refrigerator should be between 0 ° C and 5 ° C to ensure that your fresh food is the best for a long time. However, it is too cold for long-term wine storage, and the dry environment in it can affect the cork in a few months and produce broken drinks. The strong odor of food stored in the refrigerator can also negatively affect the quality of your wine, while long-term exposure to compressor vibrations is also unprofitable. A few days or weeks in the refrigerator is not a problem, but remove the bottle just before serving it to warm. White grapes are best served at temperatures between 7 and 11 ° C, depending on the variety (or variety) of the winery. This lower temperature emphasizes acidity and increases the freshness and crispness associated with really good white. However, if the temperature is too cold, it feels darker. So, if you heat up briefly at room temperature before drinking, you can get the best of aroma and taste. Everything you say, if your only storage choice is a warm room or a fridge, it’s always better to stay cool.

  1. Hold the bottle on the side

If you prefer bottles with natural plugs, you should store them horizontally, especially if you want to store them for a long time. In this way, the cork remains in contact with the wine, keeping it moist and swollen and preventing it from drying out. A dry stopper can affect the seal and release air in the bottle, causing your wine to break down quickly. It’s important to maintain the quality of your wine if you want to keep the bottle open for a long time. A small portable wine rack would be ideal for this. With medium-term storage or bottles that will be drunk soon, this is not too much of a concern, but storage aside will certainly not be dangerous. Of course, if your favorite wine has a screw top or synthetic plug, there’s no need to worry.

  1. Don’t be obsessed with humidity

If you don’t plan on storing wine for years and live in desert or Arctic conditions, there’s probably no need to increase humidity. Experts recommend storing wine in a place where the humidity is between 50 and 80% and 70% is considered a sweet place. Low humidity can cause dry cork, while humid conditions can cause mold and condensation, which can damage the label. However, most households are in the recommended range, so your wine will be fine during short to medium term storage. If you really want to fix the problem, you can buy a general thermometer / hygrometer that will help you identify stains in your home with the most appropriate temperature and humidity level. Of course, if you pay money for storage, you deserve to keep it as close as possible to this sweet place for humidity. That’s why we measure humidity in every wine tester we test.

  1. Store in a dark place

Sunlight in particular is bad news for your wine, and constant exposure can quickly reduce the taste of your wine. With clearer glass bottles, white wine is very susceptible to mild damage. If you don’t have a suitable space for a cupboard and want to use a wine cabinet on the kitchen table, be sure to place it outside in direct sunlight. If you choose a wine cooler, consider a model with a UV protective glass on the door, although you have to spend a little more on this feature.

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